Basic Granny Square (Tutorial)

I have a fun granny square project coming up! To make sure it is beginner friendly, I decided to do a picture tutorial on how to make a basic granny square! Granny squares are a fabulous skill to have in your wheelhouse. They are extremely versatile – you can make anything from a simple scarf or coasters to a lovely throw blanket – and they are a great way to use up those pesky scraps you don’t want to toss out but also don’t really know what to do with. Once you master the simple repeat, you can make a granny square that is teeny tiny or very large depending on what you want to achieve. If you’ve never made a granny square before (or it’s been a while and you need to brush up on your skills) look no further!

Basic Granny Square Picture Tutorial

Materials:

    • Yarn of your choice (yardage will depend on your desired size)
    • Crochet hook in the size recommended for your yarn
    • Yarn needle to weave in your ends



Pattern written in US terms

*If the picture tutorial is more than you need, scroll to the bottom for the written pattern without pictures.*

Tips: You may want to place a stitch marker in the top of your ch3 to make them easier to identify when it is time to join the round. You may have to adjust the stitches in the corners slightly to achieve a true square (just tug them gently into place).

Stich Abbreviations:

ch – chain
dc – double crochet
ch-sp – chain space
Sl st – slip stitch

Special Stitches:

cluster = 3dc

Round 1: (Round notes: ch2 between each cluster because you are creating the original 4 corners of the square)

ch4, Sl st into the first ch to join into a circle, ch3 (this counts as your fist dc)

2dc into the circle (with the ch3 this counts as your fist cluster of 3dc), ch2, place a cluster into the circle, ch2, place a cluster into the circle

 

ch2, place a cluster into the circle, ch2, Sl st into the top of the ch3 to join the round

You now have 4 clusters of 3dc with a ch2 between each cluster



Round 2: (Round notes: you ch1 between normal clusters, ch2 between corner clusters)

 

ch3 (counts as a dc), 2dc in the ch2 space BEHIND the ch3 (this is your fist cluster of this round), ch1, cluster in the next ch2 space, ch2, place a second cluster in the same ch2 space

ch1, cluster in the next ch2 space, ch2, cluster in the same ch2 space, ch1, cluster in the next ch2 space, ch2, cluster in the same ch2 space, ch1, cluster in the next ch2 space, ch2, Sl st into the top of the ch3 to join the round

You now have 8 3dc clusters (2 on each side of your square),  four ch2 spaces, and four ch1 spaces



Round 3: (Round notes: you ch1 between normal clusters, ch2 between corner clusters)

ch3 (counts as a dc), 2dc in the ch2 space BEHIND the ch3, ch1, cluster in the next ch1 space

ch1, cluster in the ch2 space (corner), ch2, place a second cluster in the ch2 space, ch1, cluster in the next ch1 space

ch1, cluster in the ch2 space (corner), ch2, place a second cluster in the ch2 space, ch1, cluster in the next ch1 space, ch1 cluster in the next ch2 space

ch2, place a second cluster in the ch2 space, ch1, cluster in the next ch1 space, ch1 cluster in the ch2 space, ch2, Sl st in the top of the ch3 to join the round.

You now have 12 clusters (3 on each side of the square), 4 ch2 spaces, and 8 ch1 spaces.



Rounds 4+: (Round notes: you ch1 between normal clusters, ch2 between corner clusters)

ch3 (counts as a dc), 2dc in the ch2 space BEHIND the chain, *Repeat-1: ch1, cluster in each ch1 space, ch1* to the ch2 space (corner). *Repeat-2 In the ch2 space, cluster, ch2, cluster in the same space* repeat 1 & 2 around the square (you will end with a cluster, ch2). Sl st into the top of the ch3 to join the round.

Continue adding rounds until you reach your desired size. Size will vary greatly depending you the weight of the yarn and hook size that you use. If you are following a pattern that uses granny squares, it should tell you what size to aim for.

 

Each round grows by 4 clusters (1 on each side). You can count your rounds by counting the clusters vertically starting at the center or by counting the clusters across one edge (see images below).

Things to watch out for: The most common mistake I make with granny squares is adding an extra dc in the first cluster of a round (I forget that the ch3 counts as a dc) and it makes a bulky spot in the square. I won’t lie, sometimes I ignore those types of mistakes (very few people – if any- would ever notice!). Another common mistake is missing a corner cluster. If you find that your squares are looking a bit lopsided, I would recommend checking for a missing (or extra) cluster.

Looking for more project ideas for your granny squares? Check out my post on joining squares with the Flat Braid Join Method. Don’t want to bother with joining your squares? Make a giant one! It makes a beautiful square blanket all on it’s own 😉

I would love to see your projects! If you share photos on social media, please tag me so I can see them! Instagram: @stitchmein_ or hashtags #stitchmein_ #stitchmein_makers   and   Facebook: @StitchMeInbyStephanie

All photos and descriptions used in this tutorial are my own. Please do not copy them. If you would like to share this tutorial, please do so by providing a link to my page.

Happy crocheting!

Yarn used in tutorial: Hobby Lobby I Love This Yarn Metallics in Jelly Bean

Basic Granny Square Written Instructions

Materials:

    • Yarn of your choice (yardage will depend on your desired size)
    • Crochet hook in the size recommended for your yarn
    • Yarn needle to weave in your ends

Pattern written in US terms

Tips: You may want to place a stitch marker in the top of your ch3 to make them easier to identify when it is time to join the round. You may have to adjust the stitches in the corners slightly to achieve a true square (just tug them gently into place).

Stich Abbreviations:

ch – chain
dc – double crochet
ch-sp – chain space
Sl st – slip stitch

Special Stitches:

cluster = 3dc

Round 1: (Round notes: ch2 between each cluster because you are creating the original 4 corners of the square)

ch4, Sl st into the first ch to join into a circle

ch3 (this counts as your fist dc), 2dc into the circle (with the ch3 this counts as your fist cluster of 3dc), ch2, place a cluster into the circle, ch2, place a cluster into the circle, ch2, place a cluster into the circle, ch2, Sl st into the top of the ch3 to join the round

You now have 4 clusters of 3dc with a ch2 between each cluster

Round 2:

(Round notes: you ch1 between normal clusters, ch2 between corner clusters)

ch3 (counts as a dc), 2dc in the ch2 space BEHIND the ch3 (this is your fist cluster of this round)

ch1, cluster in the next ch2 space, ch2, place a second cluster in the same ch2 space, ch1, cluster in the next ch2 space, ch2, cluster in the same ch2 space, ch1, cluster in the next ch2 space, ch2, cluster in the same ch2 space, ch1, cluster in the next ch2 space, ch2, Sl st into the top of the ch3 to join the round

You now have 8 3dc clusters (2 on each side of your square),  four ch2 spaces, and four ch1 spaces



Round 3: (Round notes: you ch1 between normal clusters, ch2 between corner clusters)

ch3 (counts as a dc), 2dc in the ch2 space BEHIND the ch3, ch1, cluster in the next ch1 space, ch1, cluster in the ch2 space (corner), ch2, place a second cluster in the ch2 space, ch1, cluster in the next ch1 space, ch1, cluster in the ch2 space (corner), ch2, place a second cluster in the ch2 space, ch1, cluster in the next ch1 space, ch1 cluster in the next ch2 space, ch2, place a second cluster in the ch2 space, ch1, cluster in the next ch1 space, ch1 cluster in the ch2 space, ch2, Sl st in the top of the ch3 to join the round.

You now have 12 clusters (3 on each side of the square), 4 ch2 spaces, and 8 ch1 spaces.

Rounds 4+: (Round notes: you ch1 between normal clusters, ch2 between corner clusters)

ch3 (counts as a dc), 2dc in the ch2 space BEHIND the chain, *Repeat-1: ch1, cluster in each ch1 space, ch1* to the ch2 space (corner). *Repeat-2 In the ch2 space, cluster, ch2, cluster in the same space* repeat 1 & 2 around the square (you will end with a cluster, ch2). Sl st into the top of the ch3 to join the round.

Continue adding rounds until you reach your desired size. Size will vary greatly depending you the weight of the yarn and hook size that you use. If you are following a pattern that uses granny squares, it should tell you what size to aim for.

 

Each round grows by 4 clusters (1 on each side). You can count your rounds by counting the clusters vertically starting at the center or by counting the clusters across one edge (see images below).

Things to watch out for: The most common mistake I make with granny squares is adding an extra dc in the first cluster of a round (I forget that the ch3 counts as a dc) and it makes a bulky spot in the square. I won’t lie, sometimes I ignore those types of mistakes (very few people – if any- would ever notice!). Another common mistake is missing a corner cluster. If you find that your squares are looking a bit lopsided, I would recommend checking for a missing (or extra) cluster.

Looking for more project ideas for your granny squares? Check out my post on joining squares with the Flat Braid Join Method. Don’t want to bother with joining your squares? Make a giant one! It makes a beautiful square blanket all on it’s own 😉

Yarn used in tutorial: Hobby Lobby I Love This Yarn Metallics in Jelly Bean

I would love to see your projects! If you share photos on social media, please tag me so I can see them! Instagram: @stitchmein_ or hashtags #stitchmein_ #stitchmein_makers   and   Facebook: @StitchMeInbyStephanie

All photos and descriptions used in this tutorial are my own. Please do not copy them. If you would like to share this tutorial, please do so by providing a link to my page.

Happy crocheting!

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